Positions for Full-time and Part-time Sessionals

Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences


Community, Culture and Global Studies

There are no postings at this time.

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Biology

The Department of Biology of the Irving K. Barber school of Arts and Sciences at UBC, Okanagan campus, requires an instructor to teach the following course during the Winter Session (2018W Term 2).

WINTER SESSION 2018: TERM 2 – JANUARY to APRIL, 2019

BIOL 312 (3) Virology
Study of viral agents of infectious disease in eukaryotes. Viral pathogens investigated with respect to classification, structure, replication, mechanisms of pathogenesis, clinical disease caused, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control. Topics include properties and uses of antiviral agents, production and use of vaccines, and bioterrorism.

Applicants with a PhD in ecology or a related discipline, relevant professional experience, and post-secondary teaching experience are preferred. Interested applicants should submit
• a Curriculum Vitae (including but not limited to previous teaching experience),
• recent teaching evaluations (if available), and
• the name of three referees who have agreed to submit letters of reference directly to Barb Lucente at barb.lucente@ubc.ca.

Deadline for receipt of application is July 13, 2018. Review of the applications will begin on July 20, 2018. Please send application documents in electronic format using WORD or PDF files to: Barb Lucente at barb.lucente@ubc.ca or send documents to:

Barb Lucente, Senior Administrative Assistant
Department of Biology
University of British Columbia – Okanagan
SCI 155, 1177 Research Road Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7
Phone: 250-807-8935

For more information regarding the position, please contact Dr. Michael Deyholos at michael.deyholos@ubc.ca. All positions are subject to funding and enrolment.

“Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.”

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Chemistry

There are no postings at this time.

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Psychology

 

Department of Psychology

The Department of Psychology of the Irving K. Barber school of Arts and Sciences at UBC, Okanagan campus, requires sessional instructors to teach the following course(s) during Terms 1 and 2 of Winter 2018-19.

Term 1 (September 1-December 31, 2018)

PSYO 219 (3) Introduction to Cognition

A brief introduction to how the mind works from a cognitive perspective. Topics will be drawn from memory, decision making, reasoning, attention, object perception, and speech and language. [3-0-0]

PSYO 343 (3) Psychopathology I

Detailed introduction to general principles underlying scientific study of mental health and psychopathology. Critical theoretical and methodological issues related to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological disorders. Psychological disorders used to illustrate general issues and principles discussed. [3-0-0]

PSYO 353 (3) Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality I

Academic overview of human sexuality from a biological, psychological, and behavioural perspective. Examination of the difficulties of research in the area of human sexuality, biological foundations of sexuality, human reproduction, birth control, and psychosexual development. [3-0-0]

PSYO 372 (3) Research Methods and Statistics

Examination of sophisticated research designs and associated statistical methods. Direct research experience involving design, collection, and analysis of data in a formal research report; familiarity with use of computer programs to analyze research results. [3-3-0]

Term 2 (January 1- April 30, 2019)

PSYO 220 (3) Lifespan Development

Introduction to the field of lifespan developmental psychology. Examination of the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of the individual from conception through later adulthood. [3-0-0]

PSYO 271 (3) Introduction to Data Analysis

Introduction to behavioural data analysis focusing on the use of inferential statistics in psychology and the conceptual interpretation of data as related to basic experimental designs (laboratory, field research methods). A required course for students majoring in Psychology. [3-0-0]

PSYO 354 (3) Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality II

Academic overview of human sexuality from a biological, psychosocial, and behavioural perspective. Sexual behaviour, sexual complications and their treatment, attraction and love, sexual orientation, and problematic sexual behaviour. [3-0-0]

 

Applicants with a PhD in the discipline or a related discipline, and relevant research and post-secondary teaching experience are preferred. 

Interested applicants should submit a curriculum vita (including but not limited to previous teaching experience), recent teaching evaluations (if available), and the name of three referees who have agreed to submit letter of references directly to bsasadminu4@exchange.ubc.ca

The deadline for receipt of applications is April 30, 2018.

Please send application documents in electronic format using WORD or PDF files to: bsasadminu4@exchange.ubc.ca or send documents via mail to:

Marla MacDonald
Unit Assistant, Psychology
University of British Columbia – Okanagan
ART 321 – 1147 Research Road
Kelowna, B.C. V1V 1V7
Phone: (250) 807-9528
Fax: (250) 807-8439

 

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

 

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Computer Science | Mathematics | Physics | Statistics

The Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics Department of the Irving K. Barber school of Arts and Sciences at UBC, Okanagan campus, requires one or more instructors to teach the following courses during the Winter Sessions of 2018.

Term 1 (Sept. 4, – Dec. 18, 2018)

ASTR 110 Astrophysics I

Physical principles of the celestial sphere, laws of motion, light, and optics; observational techniques using earth-based telescopes, artificial satellites, and inter-planetary probes; planets, moons, and smaller bodies in our solar system.

COSC 101 Digital Citizenship

Provides knowledge and skills to navigate the digital society. The importance of digital participation will be investigated by studying issues surrounding digital access, skills, and utilization. Digital literacy is emphasized through the exploration of computer applications, the use of converging technologies, and online resources.

COSC 222 Data Structures

Introduction to the design, implementation and analysis of data structures. Topics will include lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs.

COSC 223 Principle of Computing: Logic, Discrete Structure, and Data Structure

Propositional logic and logic inference, problem-solving techniques (recursion, induction, and mathematical proof), models of computation (theory of finite automata), graph theory, data structures (linear data structures, dictionaries, and graphs), basic algorithmic techniques.

COSC 301 Introduction to Data Analytics

Techniques for computation, analysis, and visualization of data using software. Manipulation of small and large data sets. Automation using scripting. Real-world applications from life sciences, physical sciences, economics, engineering, or psychology.

COSC 305 Project Management

Examine tools and techniques to complete projects successfully, and within budget. Topics include Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) and Critical Path Methods (CPM), and project management software.

COSC 331 Principles of Computer Science

An introduction to different programming paradigms and theories of computation. Functional programming and basics of lambda calculus; logic programming and basics of propositional and first-order logic; regular languages and finite automaton.

COSC 360 Web Programming

Design and implementation of web-based information systems and app development. Rich user interfaces, asynchronous updates, client-side and server-side scripting using standard technologies such as HTML, CSS, SVG, JavaScript, PHP. Data manipulation with SQL, JSON, XML. Modern scripting frameworks and libraries.

 COSC 435 Computer-Based Image Analysis

Digital processing of remotely sensed image data. Techniques for acquiring, calibrating, registering, enhancing, and interpreting digital images are included.

MATH 100 Differential Calculus with Applications to Physical Sciences and Engineering

Derivatives of elementary functions, limits. Covers applications and modelling: graphing and optimization.

MATH 125 Pre-Calculus
Prepares students for a calculus course. Functions and their graphs; inverse functions; algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric functions; trigonometric identities; matrices; determinants; complex numbers; binomial theorem; sequences; series; conic selections.

MATH 221 Matrix Algebra
Systems of linear equations, operations on matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of symmetric matrices.

MATH 319 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations

Methods of separation of variable, Fourier series, heat, wave and Laplace’s equations, boundary value problems, eigenfunction expansions, and Sturm-Liouville problems.

PHYS 111 Introductory Physics for the Physical Sciences I

Introduction to mechanics primarily for students majoring in the physical sciences (e.g. physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, geology, physical geography) or engineering. Particle kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, momentum, gravitation, rigid body motion, fluid statics and dynamics with applications to the physical sciences.

PHYS 112 Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences I

Introduction to mechanics primarily for students majoring in the life sciences (e.g. biochemistry, biology, microbiology, pharmacy, human kinetics, human geography or psychology). Particle kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, momentum, gravitation, rigid body motion, fluid statics and dynamics with applications to the biological sciences.

STAT 121 Elementary Statistics
Descriptive and inferential statistics, elementary probability, probability distributions, estimation of parameters, hypotheses testing, correlation, linear regression.

Term 2 (Jan. 2 – Apr. 26 2019)

COSC 111 Computer Programming I

Introduction to the design, implementation, and understanding of computer programs. Topics include problem solving, algorithm design, and data and procedural abstraction, with emphasis on the development of working programs.

COSC 114 Vector Graphics and Animations

Foundation and applications of 2D /3D Euclidean geometry necessary for the computer manipulation of curves and surfaces; decomposition of a picture into basic objects; planar and spatial linear transformations; automatic picture generation and introduction to algorithmic art.

COSC 264 Introduction to Web Development and Databases

Construction of simple database-driven websites. Introduction to web programming: client-side, server-side; database design, implementation, and query.

COSC 301 Introduction to Data Analytics

Techniques for computation, analysis, and visualization of data using software. Manipulation of small and large data sets. Automation using scripting. Real-world applications from life sciences, physical sciences, economics, engineering, or psychology. No prior computing background is required.

COSC 328 Introduction to Networks

The five-layer Internet architecture using TCP/IP: application, transport, network, link, and physical. Topics include web protocols, network programming, routing, addressing, congestion control, error handling, Ethernet, wireless networks, security, multimedia transmission, and network management.

COSC 407 Introduction to Parallel Computing

Design and implementation of parallel programs including theoretical computer models, parallel architectures (distributed, multicore, GPU), and standard parallel libraries.

DATA 410 Regression and Generalized Linear Models

Regression, linear models, generalized linear models, additive models, generalized additive models, mixed models. Theory and numerical performance.

DATA 543 Data Collection

Fundamental techniques in the collection of data. Focus will be devoted to understanding the effects of randomization, restrictions on randomization, repeated measures and blocking on the model fitting.

DATA 552 Communication and Argumentation

Interpretation of data. Argumentation: hypothesis, claim, evidence and inference. Model limitations: bias, validity, reliability, sensitive analysis.

MATH 101 Integral Calculus with Applications to Physical Sciences and Engineering

Definite integral, integration techniques, applications, modelling, linear ODE’s.

MATH 126 Basic Mathematics: An Aboriginal Perspective

Topics used in university courses: algebra, functions, graphs, basic geometry, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions. Employs cyclical process of analysis and synthesis common to some Aboriginal culture.

MATH 225 Introduction to Differential Equations

First-order equations, initial value problems, existence and uniqueness theorems, second-order linear equations, superposition of solutions, independence, general solutions, non-homogeneous equations, phaseplane analysis, numerical methods, matrix methods for linear systems, and applications of differential equations to the physical, biological, and social sciences.

MATH 317 Calculus IV

Parametrizations, inverse and implicit functions, integrals with respect to length and area; grad, div, and curl, and theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes.

PHYS 215 Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics at an intermediate level. Temperature, heat and work, the First Law, heat transfer, heat engines, entropy, and the Second Law.

PHYS 441 Experimental Physics II

Student designs and constructs a single experiment in solid-state physics, fluid dynamics, particle physics, astrophysics, optics or electromagnetism. Emphasis on experimental design, construction, and formal presentation of results.

STAT 124 Business Statistics

Introduction to surveys and simple sampling strategies; descriptive methods for one and two variables; frequency distributions; correlation and regression; descriptive methods for time series and index numbers; and probability and relationship to statistical inference.

Term 3 (Sept. 4, 2018 – Apr. 26 2019)

COSC 499 Capstone Software Engineering Project

A capstone project requiring team software development for an actual client. Students must produce a comprehensive report and deliver a formal presentation.

 

Applicants with a PhD in a relevant or related discipline, and relevant research and post-secondary teaching experience are preferred. Interested applicants should submit a Curriculum vitae (including but not limited to previous teaching experience), recent teaching evaluations (if available), and the name of three referees who have agreed to submit letters of reference on request.

Deadline for receipt of applications for the winter session is June 8, 2018. Please send application documents in electronic format using WORD or PDF files to the Assistant to the Head of Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics and Statistics: janelle.lessard@ubc.ca  or send documents to:

Janelle Lessard
Senior Department Assistant to Dr. W. John Braun
University of British Columbia – Okanagan
Science 387
1177 Research Road
Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7

For more information regarding the positions, please contact Janelle Lessard (janelle.lessard@ubc.ca). All positions are subject to funding and enrolment.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

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History and Sociology

The Department of History & Sociology of the Irving K. Barber school of Arts and Sciences at UBC, Okanagan campus, requires a sessional instructor to teach the following course during Term 1 of Winter 2018-19.

Term 1 (September 1-December 31, 2018)

HIST 115 (3) World History from First to Second World War
Study of the emergence of the contemporary world from the origins of World War I to the aftermath of World War II. [3-0-0]

Applicants with a PhD in the discipline or a related discipline, and relevant research and post-secondary teaching experience are preferred.  Interested applicants should submit:

  • a curriculum vita (including but not limited to previous teaching experience),
  • a brief teaching dossier and recent teaching evaluations (if available),
  • the name of three referees who have agreed to submit letter of references directly to the Department Assistant, Barbara Wilke at wilke@ubc.ca

The deadline for receipt of applications is June 29, 2018. Please send application documents in electronic format using PDF files to history.okanagan@ubc.ca or send documents via mail to:

Barbara Wilke, Department Assistant,
UBC Okanagan Campus IKBSAS – Department of History and Sociology
Arts Building Room 313
1147 Research Way Kelowna,
BC V1V 1V7

For more information regarding these positions please contact Department Head Dr. Catherine Higgs at catherine.higgs@ubc.ca.  All positions are subject to funding.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

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 Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences

The Department of Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences of the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences at UBC Okanagan requires sessional instructors to teach the following courses:

WINTER 2018: Term 1 September to December 2018

EESC 101 Environmental Science

A quantitative and scientific approach to the understanding of global energy, water and nutrient cycling; growth of human populations and their effects on the environment and ecosystem function. Functional understanding of modern environmental issues, and the requirements of, and opportunities for, sustainability.

EESC 502 Environmetrics

Foundation for the use of statistical concepts/methods in environmental sciences (ES) and management. Overview of methodology relevant to ES, followed by the study of specific topics drawn from current or classical environmental problems. Emphasis on scientific problem solving using statistical methods. Integration of the formulation of objectives, study design, and quantitative methods will guide the study of chosen topics. Key component: the role and use of statistical software packages.

 

WINTER 2018: Term 2 January to April 2019

EESC 101 Environmental Science

A quantitative and scientific approach to the understanding of global energy, water and nutrient cycling; growth of human populations and their effects on the environment and ecosystem function. Functional understanding of modern environmental issues, and the requirements of, and opportunities for, sustainability.

EESC I GEOG 205 Introduction to Hydrology

Principles of hydrology at site, watershed, and regional scales. Techniques of measurement and analysis. Emphasizes surface water hydrology of western North America. Credit will be granted for only one of EESC 205 or GEO 205. Equivalency: GEOG 205.

EESC 213 Introductory Forest Science and Management

Global forests, classification, silviculture, forest tenure systems, forest policy evolution, forest regulations, and the profession. Overview of forest disturbance impacts, eco-forestry, sustainable forest management, eco-certification, the role of information technologies and research.

EESC 313 Management of Forested Watersheds

Effects of watershed management on water quality and quantity, channel morphology, in-stream wood, and aquatic habitat. Emphasizing integrated land use management and the maintenance of critical watershed functions and services.

EESC 413 Analytical Methods in Hydrology

Application of advanced analytical methods to hydrological data for watershed or water resource planning and management. Frequency analysis, storm design, regionalization, flow routing, geographic information systems (GIS) application, time series analysis and modelling.

 

EESC 425 Tectonics and Orogenesis

Large-scale Earth structure, tectonic environments, Archean geology and the initiation of plate tectonics. Analytical toolsets. Orogenesis within the Canadian Cordillera, the Andes, the Alps, and the Himalaya.

 

Applicants with a PhD in the discipline, or a related discipline, and relevant research and post-secondary teaching experience are preferred. Interested applicants should forward a curriculum vita, evidence of teaching ability (e.g., course evaluations if available), and two letters of reference sent directly to the department by their referees.  The deadline for receipt of applications is May 31, 2018.

Please send application documents in electronic format using WORD or PDF files to: EESC.GEOG.okanagan@ubc.ca or send documents via mail to:

University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus
IKBSAS – Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences
Attention:  Janet Heisler
Senior Administrative Assistant
305 Science Building
1177 Research Road
Kelowna, BC Canada V1V 1V7

For more information regarding the positions, please contact Dr. Edward Hornibrook, Head at Ed.Hornibrook@ubc.ca

All positions are subject to funding and enrollment.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

 

 

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Economics | Philosophy | Political Science

 

The Economics, Philosophy, and Political Science Department of the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences at UBC Okanagan is likely to require sessional instructor(s) to teach the following courses and tutorial sections in Winter Session 2018-19.

TERM 1 (September 1 – December 31, 2018) 

ECON 327 Introduction to Empirical Economics

The essentials of probability and statistics for applied work in economics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance.

ECON 391 – Economic Data Analysis

 

TERM 1 (September 1 – December 31, 2018) and 2 (January 1 – April 30, 2019)

 The tutorial sections for ECON 204 – Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

Microtheory course at the post-principles level. Analysis of consumer behaviour, production, exchange, equilibrium of the firm under varying market structures, factor markets, economic efficiency, and welfare.

The tutorial sections for ECON 205 – Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

Macrotheory course at the post-principles level. Income and employment theory, monetary and fiscal policies, the impact of international trade and finance on the domestic economy, economic growth and fluctuations.

Applicants with a graduate degree in Economics or a related discipline, and post-secondary teaching or tutorial work experience are preferred.  Interested applicants should forward a Curriculum vitae and three letters of reference, plus recent teaching evaluations (if available) to Andrew Irvine, Head (andrew.irvine@ubc.ca).  Please send application documents in electronic format using WORD or PDF files. The deadline for receipt of applications is June 6, 2018.

Applications sent by mail, please address to:

Andrew Irvine
c/o Tiffany Clarke, Senior Department Assistant
Economics, Philosophy, and Political Science
University of British Columbia Okanagan
ART 263
1147 Research Road
Kelowna, BC Canada V1V 1V7
Phone:  250 807-9124

All positions are subject to funding and enrollment. For more information, please contact Dr. Andrew Irvine at andrew.irvine@ubc.ca. 

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

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